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I-15/I-215 Devore Interchange Improvements

I-15/I-215 Devore Interchange Improvements

Improving travel between Los Angeles, the High Desert, Las Vegas, and beyond
Location
San Bernardino, California
Client
California Department of Transportation
Designer
URS Corporation
Contract Value
$208,000,000
Completion Date
2016
Market Sector
Roadways & Bridges
Capabilities
Design-Build
Preconstruction
Self Performance
The purpose of the Devore Interchange Project is to reduce congestion, accidents, and improve freeway operation through the I-15/I-215 Interchange in San Bernardino County - one of the worst grade-related bottlenecks in the United States. The project will add one lane in each direction, build 18 bridges, and reconnect the historic Route 66, which was severed during the construction of the original interchange 40 years ago. The team will build a new I-15 mainline northbound connector to restore route continuity and reduce operational deficiencies. A truck bypass lane in each direction will eliminate functional problems related to weaving trucks and improve safety for passenger cars traveling at higher speeds. Work includes extensive drainage structures, construction over three railroad tracks, and significant environmental permit requirements related to the Cajon Wash and a protected species—the Kangaroo Rat. 
 
More than one million vehicles travel through the interchange weekly and more than 21,000 trucks pass through daily. The interchange is used for freight movement, recreational vehicles, and commuters, causing traffic congestion for up to five miles.
 
During the procurement period, the Atkinson team optimized the proposed design to provide the best overall project for Caltrans, the environment, the community, and drivers. The team's design and construction approach:
  • Reduces bridge construction by 20%
  • Reduces earthwork cuts by 10%
  • Eliminates imported borrow fill material altogether
  • Shortens the overall project schedule by four months
  • Minimizes the required right-of-way by over 12 acres and saved eight private residences.

 

This much-anticipated project is going to make driving less stressful for commuters, truckers, and tourists while at the same time providing jobs for the Inland Empire.
Malcolm Dougherty, Director, Caltrans